Play and create little retro games at Smolpxl

Andy Balaam from Andy Balaam's Blog

I love simple games: playing them and writing them.

But, it can be overwhelming getting started in the complex ecosystems of modern technology.

So, I am writing the Smolpxl library, which is some JavaScript code that makes it quite simple to write simple, pixellated games. It gives you a fixed-size screen to draw on, and it handles your game loop and frames-per-second, so you can focus on two things: updating your game “model” – the world containing all the things that exist in your game, and drawing onto the screen.

I am also writing some games with this library, and publishing them at smolpxl.artificialworlds.net:

I am hoping this site will gradually gain more and more Free and Open Source games, and start to rival some of the advertising-supported sites for the attention of casual gamers, especially kids.

Smolpxl is done for fun, and for its educational value, so it should be a safer place for kids than a world of advertising, loot boxes and site-wide currencies.

As I write games, I want to show how easy and fun it can be, so I will be streaming myself live doing it on twitch.tv/andybalaam, and putting the recordings up on peertube.mastodon.host/accounts/andybalaam and youtube.com/user/ajbalaam.

I am hoping these videos will serve as tutorials that help other people get into writing simple games.

Would you like to help? If so:

We Three Kings – baron m.

baron m. from thus spake a.k.

Sir R----- my fine friend! Will you take a glass of perry with me to cool yourself from this summer heat?

Good man!

Might I also presume that you are in the mood for a wager?

Stout fellow!

I suggest a game that ever puts me in mind of that time in my youth when I squired for the warrior king Balthazar during his pilgrimage with kings Melchior and Caspar to the little town of Bethlehem.

On May The Fours Be With You – student

student from thus spake a.k.

In their most recent wager Sir R-----'s goal was to guess the outcome of the Baron's roll of four four sided dice at a cost of four coins and a prize, if successful, of forty four. On the face of it this seems a rather meagre prize since there are two hundred and fifty six possible outcomes of the Baron's throw. Crucially, however, the fact that the order of the matching dice was not a matter of consequence meant that Sir R-----'s chances were significantly improved.

May The Fours Be With You – baron m.

baron m. from thus spake a.k.

Sir R-----! Come join me for a glass of chilled wine! I have a notion that you're in the mood for a wager. What say you?

I knew it!

I have in mind a game of dice that reminds me of my time as the Russian military attaché to the city state of Coruscant and its territories during the traitorous popular uprising fomented by the blasphemous teachings of a fundamentalist religious sect known as the Jedi.

On Fruitful Opals – student

student from thus spake a.k.

Recall that the Baron’s game consisted of guessing under which of a pair of cups was to be found a token for a stake of four cents and a prize, if correct, of one. Upon success, Sir R----- could have elected to play again with three cups for the same stake and double the prize. Success at this and subsequent rounds gave him the opportunity to play another round for the same stake again with one more cup than the previous round and a prize equal to that of the previous round multiplied by its number of cups.

Fruitful Opals – baron m.

baron m. from thus spake a.k.

Greetings Sir R-----. I trust that I find you in good spirits this evening? Will you take a glass of this excellent porter and join me in a little sport?

Splendid!

I propose a game that is popular amongst Antipodean opal scavengers as a means to improve their skill at guesswork.
Opals, as any reputable botanist will confirm, are the seeds of the majestic opal tree which grows in some abundance atop the vast monoliths of that region. Its mouth-watering fruits are greatly enjoyed by the Titans on those occasions when, attracted by its entirely confused seasons, they choose to winter thereabouts.

On Two By Two – student

student from thus spake a.k.

The Baron's most recent wager with Sir R----- set him the challenge of being the last to remove a horizontally, vertically or diagonally adjacent pair of draughts from a five by five square of them, with the Baron first taking a single draught and Sir R----- and he thereafter taking turns to remove such pairs.

When I heard these rules I was reminded of the game of Cram and could see that, just like it, the key to figuring the outcome is to recognise that the Baron could always have kept the remaining draughts in a state of symmetry, thereby ensuring that however Sir R----- had chosen he shall subsequently have been free to make a symmetrically opposing choice.

Two By Two – baron m.

baron m. from thus spake a.k.

Hello there Sir R-----! Come join me by the hearth for a dram of warming spirits! I trust that this cold spell has not chilled your desire for a wager?

Good man! Good man!

I must say that the contrast between the warmth of this fire and the frost outside brings most vividly to my mind an occasion during my tenure as the Empress's ambassador to the land of Oz; specifically the time that I attended King Quadling Rex's winter masked ball during which his southern palace was overrun by an infestation of Snobbles!

On The Octogram Of Seth LaPod – student

student from thus spake a.k.

The latest wager that the Baron put to Sir R----- had them competing to first chalk a triangle between three of eight coins, with Sir R----- having the prize if neither of them managed to do so. I immediately recognised this as the game known as Clique and consequently that Sir R-----'s chances could be reckoned by applying the pigeonhole principle and the tactic of strategy stealing. Indeed, I said as much to the Baron but I got the distinct impression that he wasn't really listening.