Software engineering research problems having worthwhile benefits

Derek Jones from The Shape of Code

Which software engineering research problems are likely to yield good-enough solutions that provide worthwhile benefits to professional software developers?

I can think of two (hopefully there are more):

  • what is the lifecycle of software? For instance, the expected time-span of the active use of its various components, and the evolution of its dependency ecosystem,
  • a model of the main processes involved in a software development project.

Solving problems requires data, and I think it is practical to collect the data needed to solve these two problems; here is some: application lifetime data, and detailed project data (a lot more is needed).

Once a good-enough solution is available, its practical application needs to provide a worthwhile benefit to the customer (when I was in the optimizing compiler business, I found that many customers were not interested in more compact code unless the executable was at least a 10% smaller; this was the era of computer memory often measured in kilobytes).

Investment decisions require information about what is likely to happen in the future, and an understanding of common software lifecycles is needed. The fact that most source code has a brief existence (a few years) and is rarely modified by somebody other than the original author, has obvious implications for investment decisions intended to reduce future maintenance costs.

Running a software development project requires an understanding of the processes involved. This knowledge is currently acquired by working on projects managed by people who have successfully done it before. A good-enough model is not going to replace the need for previous experience, some amount of experience is always going to be needed, but it will provide an effective way of understanding what is going on. There are probably lots of different good-enough ways of running a project, and I’m not expecting there to be a one-true-way of optimally running a project.

Perhaps the defining characteristic of the solution to both of these problems is lots of replication data.

Applications are developed in many ecosystems, and there is likely to be variations between the lifecycles that occur in different ecosystems. Researchers tend to focus on Github because it is easily accessible, which is no good when replications from many ecosystems are needed (an analysis of Github source lifetime has been done).

Projects come in various shapes and sizes, and a good-enough model needs to handle all the combinations that regularly occur. Project level data is not really present on Github, so researchers need to get out from behind their computers and visit real companies.

Given the payback time-frame for software engineering research, there are problems which are not cost-effective to attempt to answer. Suggestions for other software engineering problems likely to be worthwhile trying to solve welcome.