A new career in software development: advice for non-youngsters

Derek Jones from The Shape of Code

Lately I have been encountering non-young people looking to switch careers, into software development. My suggestions have centered around the ageism culture and how they can take advantage of fashions in software ecosystems to improve their job prospects.

I start by telling them the good news: the demand for software developers outstrips supply, followed by the bad news that software development culture is ageist.

One consequence of the preponderance of the young is that people are heavily influenced by fads and fashions, which come and go over less than a decade.

The perception of technology progresses through the stages of fashionable, established and legacy (management-speak for unfashionable).

Non-youngsters can leverage the influence of fashion’s impact on job applicants by focusing on what is unfashionable, the more unfashionable the less likely that youngsters will apply, e.g., maintaining Cobol and Fortran code (both seriously unfashionable).

The benefits of applying to work with unfashionable technology include more than a smaller job applicant pool:

  • new technology (fashion is about the new) often experiences a period of rapid change, and keeping up with change requires time and effort. Does somebody with a family, or outside interests, really want to spend time keeping up with constant change at work? I suspect not,
  • systems depending on unfashionable technology have been around long enough to prove their worth, the sunk cost has been paid, and they will continue to be used until something a lot more cost-effective turns up, i.e., there is more job security compared to systems based on fashionable technology that has yet to prove their worth.

There is lots of unfashionable software technology out there. Software can be considered unfashionable simply because of the language in which it is written; some of the more well known of such languages include: Fortran, Cobol, Pascal, and Basic (in a multitude of forms), with less well known languages including, MUMPS, and almost any mainframe related language.

Unless you want to be competing for a job with hordes of keen/cheaper youngsters, don’t touch Rust, Go, or anything being touted as the latest language.

Databases also have a fashion status. The unfashionable include: dBase, Clarion, and a whole host of 4GL systems.

Be careful with any database that is NoSQL related, it may be fashionable or an established product being marketed using the latest buzzwords.

Testing and QA have always been very unsexy areas to work in. These areas provide the opportunity for the mature applicants to shine by highlighting their stability and reliability; what company would want to entrust some young kid with deciding whether the software is ready to be released to paying customers?

More suggestions for non-young people looking to get into software development welcome.

NoEstimates panders to mismanagement and developer insecurity

Derek Jones from The Shape of Code

Why do so few software development teams regularly attempt to estimate the duration of the feature/task/functionality they are going to implement?

Developers hate giving estimates; estimating is very hard and estimates are often inaccurate (at a minimum making the estimator feel uncomfortable and worse when management treats an estimate as a quotation). The future is uncertain and estimating provides guidance.

Managers tell me that the fear of losing good developers dissuades them from requiring teams to make estimates. Developers have told them that they would leave a company that required them to regularly make estimates.

For most of the last 70 years, demand for software developers has outstripped supply. Consequently, management has to pay a lot more attention to the views of software developers than the views of those employed in most other roles (at least if they want to keep the good developers, i.e., those who will have no problem finding another job).

It is not difficult for developers to get a general idea of how their salary, working conditions and practices compares with other developers in their field/geographic region. They know that estimating is not a common practice, and unless the economy is in recession, finding a new job that does not require estimation could be straight forward.

Management’s demands for estimates has led to the creation of various methods for calculating proxy estimate values, none of which using time as the unit of measure, e.g., Function points and Story points. These methods break the requirements down into smaller units, and subcomponents from these units are used to calculate a value, e.g., the Function point calculation includes items such as number of user inputs and outputs, and number of files.

How accurate are these proxy values, compared to time estimates?

As always, software engineering data is sparse. One analysis of 149 projects found that Cost approx FunctionPoints^{0.75}, with the variance being similar to that found when time was estimated. An analysis of Function point calculation data found a high degree of consistency in the calculations made by different people (various Function point organizations have certification schemes that require some degree of proficiency to pass).

Managers don’t seem to be interested in comparing estimated Story points against estimated time, preferring instead to track the rate at which Story points are implemented, e.g., velocity, or burndown. There are tiny amounts of data comparing Story points with time and Function points.

The available evidence suggests a relationship connecting Function points to actual time, and that Function points have similar error bounds to time estimates; the lack of data means that Story points are currently just a source of technobabble and number porn for management power-points (send me Story point data to help change this situation).