Evidence on the distribution and diversity of Christianity: 1900-2000

Derek Jones from The Shape of Code

I recently read an article saying that Christianity had 33,830 denominations, with 150 having more than 1 million followers. Checking the references, World Christian Encyclopedia was cited as the source; David Barrett had spent 12 years traveling the world, talking to people to collect the data. An evidence-based man, after my own heart.

Checking the second-hand book sites, I found a copy of the 1982 edition available for a few pounds, and placed an order (this edition lists 20,800 denominations; how many more are there to be ‘discovered’).

The book that arrived was a bit larger than I had anticipated. This photograph shows just how large this book is, compared to other dead-tree data sources in my collection:

World Christian Encyclopedia.

My interest in a data-driven discussion of the spread and diversity of religions, was driven by wanting ideas for measuring the spread and diversity of programming languages. Bill Kinnersley’s language list contains information on 2,500 programming languages, and there are probably an order of magnitude more languages waiting to be written about.

The data is available to researchers, but is not public :-(

The World Christian Encyclopedia is way too detailed for my needs. I usually leave unwanted books on the book table of my local train station’s Coffee shop. I have left some unusual books there in the past, but this one feels like it needs a careful owner; I will see whether the local charity shop will take it in.

Foundations for Evidence-Based Policymaking Act of 2017

Derek Jones from The Shape of Code

The Foundations for Evidence-Based Policymaking Act of 2017 was enacted by the US Congress on 21st December.

A variety of US Federal agencies are responsible for ensuring the safety of US citizens, in some cases this safety is dependent on the behavior of software. The FDA is responsible for medical device safety and the FAA publishes various software safety handbooks relating to aviation (the Department of transportation has a wider remit).

Where do people go to learn about the evidence for software related issues?

The book: Evidence-based software engineering: based on the publicly available evidence sounds like a good place to start.

Quickly skimming this (currently draft) book shows that no public evidence is available on lots of issues. Oops.

Another issue is the evidence pointing to some suggested practices being at best useless and sometimes fraudulent, e.g., McCabe’s cyclomatic complexity metric.

The initial impact of evidence-based policymaking will be companies pushing back against pointless government requirements, in particular requirements that cost money to implement. In some cases this is a good, e.g., no more charades about software being more testable because its code has a low McCable complexity.

In the slightly longer term, people are going to have to get serious about collecting and analyzing software related evidence.

The Open, Public, Electronic, and Necessary Government Data Act or the OPEN Government Data Act (which is about to become law) will be a big help in obtaining evidence. I think there is a lot of software related data sitting on disks and tapes, waiting to be analysed (NASA appears to have loads to data that they have down almost nothing with, including not making it publicly available).

Interesting times ahead.