Undergraduates and learning to program

Derek Jones from The Shape of Code

I last looked at the research on teaching programming around 10 years ago and I have been catching up with what has been going on; in brief: same old, same old. One of the best papers on the subject is still: Language-independent conceptual “Bugs”

The research activity is still focused on making the tools and language ‘better’. There is a defining silence on the possibility that those doing the teaching could not teach their way out of a paper bag. Nobody is brave enough to suggest that teacher training might be a worthwhile investment, or that lectures oriented to what is useful (rather than what the lecturer finds interesting) would be appreciated by students.

I have always thought that researching the teaching programming had no practical purpose, other than possibly helping universities increase the number of students graduating with computing degrees (some universities are solving the problem students have with programming by offering degrees that don’t involve being able to program). I still think that teaching programming to school children is at best a waste of time.

My experience with students learning to program is from a very long time ago. The process involved listening to confusing and disjoint lectures, reading books and figuring out what worked by trial and error. Students were not taught to program, they got thrown in at the deep and were expected to survive. Anybody who could handle this stood some chance of being able to handle developing software in the ‘real world'; universities were (accidentally) graduating people with the skills industry needed. However, these days universities are supposed to be customer focused, what industry needs to irrelevant (my experience of sitting on departmental industry panels is that the head of department tells us what they are thinking of doing {i.e., new courses for which there will be lots of paying students} and we try to talk him/her out of the sillier ideas); too many fee paying students find programming too hard, let’s offer computing degrees that don’t require any programming.

Would you hire a recent graduate, for a development role, who had trouble figuring out how to fix syntax errors in their code? Surely, the minimum requirement is somebody who gets some pleasure from coding, even if they don’t want to spend lots of time doing it.

There is a shortage of software developers and flying turkeys are still with us.