Archimedean Review – a.k.

a.k. from thus spake a.k.

In the last couple of posts we've been taking a look at Archimedean copulas which define the dependency between the elements of vector values of a multivariate random variable by applying a generator function φ to the values of the cumulative distribution functions, or CDFs, of their distributions when considered independently, known as their marginal distributions, and applying the inverse of the generator to the sum of the results to yield the value of the multivariate CDF.
We have seen that the densities of Archimedean copulas are rather trickier to calculate and that making random observations of them is trickier still. Last time we found an algorithm for the latter, albeit with an implementation that had troubling performance and numerical stability issues, and in this post we shall add an improved version to the ak library that addresses those issues.

Archimedean View – a.k.

a.k. from thus spake a.k.

Last time we took a look at how we could define copulas to represent the dependency between random variables by summing the results of a generator function φ applied to the results of their cumulative distribution functions, or CDFs, and then applying the inverse of that function φ-1 to that sum.
These are known as Archimedean copulas and are valid whenever φ is strictly decreasing over the interval [0,1], equal to zero when its argument equals one and have nth derivatives that are non-negative over that interval when n is even and non-positive when it is odd, for n up to the number of random variables.
Whilst such copulas are relatively easy to implement we saw that their densities are a rather trickier job, in contrast to Gaussian copulas where the reverse is true. In this post we shall see how to draw random vectors from Archimedean copulas which is also much more difficult than doing so from Gaussian copulas.

Archimedean Skew – a.k.

a.k. from thus spake a.k.

About a year and a half ago we saw how we could use Gaussian copulas to define dependencies between the elements of a vector valued multivariate random variable whose elements, when considered in isolation, were governed by arbitrary cumulative distribution functions, known as marginals. Whilst Gaussian copulas are quite flexible, they can't represent every possible dependency between those elements and in this post we shall take a look at some others defined by the Archimedean family of copulas.