Test Driven Terraform [Online – Video Conf] – 7pm, 2 April 2020.

Paul Grenyer from Paul Grenyer


We'll use TDD to create a Terraform module which builds a Heroku app and deploys a simple React application.

If you'd like to follow along, you'll need the following prerequisites

  • Terraform installed
  • Go 1.14 installed
  • Heroku account - HEROKU_API_KEY added to environment variables.
  • Git installed
  • BitBucket account

This meetup will be via Zoom:- https://zoom.us/j/902141920

Please RSVP here: https://www.meetup.com/Norfolk-Developers-NorDev/events/269640463/

Insomnium – Norwich

Paul Grenyer from Paul Grenyer

Something my first proper girlfriend said to me has stuck with me my entire life as I disagree with it (mostly).  She said that the best way to discover a new band was to see them live first. The reason I disagree is because I get most pleasure from knowing the music I am listening to live - most of the time.

I’m a member of the Bloodstock Rock Society and their Facebook page is often a place of band discussion. Lots of people there were saying how good Insomnium are, but they didn’t do a great deal for me when I listened to them on Spotify. Then it was early 2020, I hadn’t been to a gig since Shakespears Sister in November, I fancied a night out and Insomnium were playing in Norwich. So I took a chance….

From the off they were great live and I really enjoyed it. I came to the conclusion that I must like some of their older stuff as it was the new album which hadn’t done much for me. There were lots of things I like, like widdly guitars, metal riffs and blast beats, but what really lets Insomnium down is the vocals. Death metal vocals, to a certain extent, are death metal vocals, but this guy sounded like he was singing a different song in a different band - it’s the same on the album I tried. If the vocals were more suited to the music, like there are with Wintersun, it would be even better. I also learned that Norwich City’s current start player is from the same town in Finland as the band.

The first thing I did this morning was look up which albums the setlist was from an make a list:

  • One for Sorrow
  • Across the Dark
  • Above the Weeping World
  • Shadows of the Dying Sun
  • Heart like a Grave

And then die a little inside at the prices on Amazon and eBay. I think I’ll be playing a lot of Insomnium on Spotify for the time being so I’m ready to enjoy them to the full next time.



A review: .Net Core in Action

Paul Grenyer from Paul Grenyer

.Net Core in Action
by Dustin Metzgar
ISBN-13: 978-1617294273

I still get a fair amount of flack for buying and reading technical books in the 21st Century - almost as much as I get for still buying and listening to CDs. If I was a vinyl loving hipster, it would be different of course…. However, books like .Net Core in Action are a perfect example of why I do it.  I needed to learn what .Net Core was and get a feel for it very quickly and that is what this book allowed me to do.

I’ve been very sceptical of .Net development for a number of years, mostly due to how large I perceived the total cost of ownership and the startup cost to be and the fact that you have to use Windows.  While this was previously true, .Net Core is different and .Net Core in Action made me understand that within the first few pages of the first chapter. It also got me over my prejudice towards Docker by the end of the second chapter.

The first two chapters are as you would expect, an introduction followed by various Hello World examples. Then it gets a bit weird as the book dives into the build system next and then Unit testing (actually, this is good so early) and then two chapters on connecting to relational databases, writing data access layers and ORMs. There’s a sensible chapter on micro services before the weirdness returns with chapters on debugging performance profiling and internationalisation. I can kind of see how the author is trying to show the reader the way different parts of .Net core work on different platforms (Windows, Linux, Mac), but this relatively small volume could have been more concise.




DevelopHER Overall Award 2019

Paul Grenyer from Paul Grenyer

I was honoured and delighted to be asked to judge and present the overall DevelopHER award once again this year. Everyone says choosing a winner is difficult. It may be a cliche, but that doesn’t change the fact that it is.

When the 13 category winners came across my desk I read through them all and reluctantly got it down to seven. Usually on a first pass I like to have it down to three or four and then all I need to agonise over is the order. Luckily on the second pass I was able to be ruthless and get it down to four.

To make it even more difficult, three of my four fell into three categories I am passionate about:

  • Technical excellence and diversity
  • Automated Testing
  • Practical, visual Agile

And the fourth achieved results for her organisation which just couldn’t be ignored.

So I read and reread and ordered and re-ordered. Made more tea, changed the CD and re-read and re-ordered some more. Eventually it became clear.

Technical excellent and the ability for a software engineer to turn their hand to new technologies is vital. When I started my career there were basically two main programming languages, C++ and Java. C# came along soon after, but most people fell into one camp or another and a few of us crossed over. Now are are many, many more to choose from and lots of young engineers decide to specialise in one and are reluctant to learn and use others. This diminishes us all as an industry. So someone who likes to learn new and different technologies is a jewel in any company’s crown.

The implementation of Agile methodologies in Software Development is extremely important. Software, by its very nature is complex. Only on the most trivial projects does the solution the users need look anything like what they thought they wanted at the beginning. Traditional waterfall approaches to software development do not allow for this. The client requires flexibility and we as software engineers need the flexibility to deliver what they need. Software development is a learning process for both the client and the software engineer. Agile gives us a framework for this. Unlike many of the traditional methods, Agile has the flexibility to be agile itself, giving continuous improvement.

When implementing Agile processes, the practices are often forgotten or neglected and in many ways they are more important. Not least of which is automated testing. The practice of writing code which tests your code and running it at least on every checkin. This gives you a safety net that code you’ve already written isn’t broken by new code you write. And when it is, the tests tell you, they tell you what’s wrong and where it’s wrong.  We need more of this as an industry and that is why I chose Rita Cristina Leitao, an automated software tester from Switch Studios as the overall DevelopHER winner.


Shakespear Sister Ipswich November 2019

Paul Grenyer from Paul Grenyer

I was very surprised and excited and then immediately disappointed to see Shakespere Sister on the Graham Norton show. They performed Stay, which is their big hit (longest single at number in the UK be a female artist, 8 weeks), but Marcella wasn’t even trying to hit the high notes and it was awful. We decided to go and see them on tour anyway as it was potentially a once in a lifetime experience before they fell out again.

The Ipswich Regent was half empty in the stalls and the circle was closed and oddly there were quite a few security guards - apparently at the request of the band. Encouragingly Shakespear Sister came on on time and they sounded good! As they ploughed through many of their well known songs, new songs and a few older more obscure songs, the vocals were strong from both Marcella and Siobhan.

The rhythm section was incredible.  The drumming was tight, varied and interesting, but what really stood out was the bass. I think part of this was that the player had fantastic bass lines to play, but also oozed talent. It’s really uncommon for a bass player to need to change bass guitars between songs but Clare Kenny swapped frequently. It’s just a shame that the lead guitar player was totally unremarkable and I’ve no idea what the keyboard player was for.

The highlight I, and I imagine many others, had been looking forward to was Stay. It was better than with Graham Norton, but it’s clear that Marcella can not get to the highest notes and live, she doesn’t try. It was still a good performance of a fantastic song.

Would I go and see them again? Probably not, unless I was dragged.

Borknagar

Paul Grenyer from Paul Grenyer

I was pretty sure I had seen Borknagar support Cradle of Filth at the Astoria 2 in the ‘90s. It turns out that was Opeth and Extreme Noise Terror, so I don’t really remember how I got into them now.

Whatever the reason was, I really got into their 2000 album Quintessence. At the time I didn’t really enjoy their previous album, The Archaic Course, much so with the exception of the occasional relisten to Quintessence, Borknagar went by the wayside for me.  That was until ICS Vortex got himself kicked out of Dimmu Borgir for allegedly poor performances, produced a really rather bland and unlistenable solo album called Storm Seeker, and then got back properly with Borknagar.  That’s when things got interesting.

ICS Vortex has an incredible voice. When he joined Dimmu Borgir as bassist and second vocalist in time for Spiritual Black Dimensions, he brought a new dimension (pun intended) to an already amazing band. I’ve played Spiritual Black Dimensions to death since it came out and I think only Death Cult Armageddon is better.

ICS Vortex’s first album back with Borknagar is called Winter Thrice. Loving his voice and being bitterly disappointed with Storm Seeker I bought it desperately hoping for something more and I wasn’t disappointed. It’s an album with a cold feel and lyrical content about winter and the north. I loved it and played it constantly after release and regularly since. It’s progressive black metal which is the musical equivalent to walking through the snow early on a cold crisp morning.

This year Borknagar released a new album called True North. When I’ve loved an album intensely and the band brings out something new I always feel trepidation. Machine Head never bettered Burn My Eyes, WASP never bettered the Crimson Idol. I could go on, but you get the picture. True North is another album about winter and the north. So I ought to have been on safe ground, but then Arch Enemy have pretty much recorded the same album since Doomsday Machine, but never bettered it. They’re all good though.

My first listen to True North was tense, but it didn’t take long for that to dissipate. I had it on daily
play for a few weeks, together with the new albums from Winterfylleth and Opeth. True North was so brilliant I thought it might be even better than Winter Thrice. So cautiously I tried Winter Thrice again, but I wasn’t disappointed to find it was the slightly better album. The brilliant thing is that I now have two similar, but different enough albums I can enjoy again and again and other than Enslaved’s In Times, I haven’t found anything else like it.

I hope they do what Evergrey did with Hymns for the Broken, The Storm Within and The Atlantic and make it a set of three. Cross your fingers for me.

Winterfylleth

Paul Grenyer from Paul Grenyer

At school I had this friend, Jamie, and he once said to me that he always preferred having a band’s live album to their studio album of the same songs. His example was Queen’s Live Magic. To me, then, this was madness. It didn’t have all the same songs as It’s a Kind of Magic and the production isn’t as good. Let’s face it, unless it’s Pink Floyd, the production of a live album is never as good as in the studio. I avoided live albums for years.

Pink Floyd’s Pulse was the first live album I really got into and then there was nothing until the teenies when live albums from Emperor, Immortal, Arch Enemy, Dimmu Borgir and Blind Guardian got me completely hooked.

The latest live album I’ve bought is ‘The Siege Of Mercia: Live At Bloodstock 2017’ by Winterfylleth. It’s amazing for a number of reasons. I was at Bloodstock, watching the band, when it was recorded. It’s a fantastic performance of of some brilliant songs. It’s got a, atmospheric, synth version of an old track at the end. It’s encouraged me to relisten to their studio albums and enjoy them so much more.

Winterfylleth are a Black Metal band from Manchester. Their lyrics are based around England’s rich culture and heritage.  Some of their album covers and songs depict the Peak District. You’d have thought a song about Mam Tour, a hill in the Peak District, might be a bit boring, but it’s not! Maybe because, being black metal, you can’t really hear the words, but as always the vocal style, heavy guitars and fast drums make for the perfect mix.

I currently have the Siege of Mercia, along with some similar new albums from the likes of Borknager, on my regular daily playlist and it just gets better and better.

nor(DEV):biz Big Dinner with Roarr! Dinosaur Adventure

Paul Grenyer from Paul Grenyer



What: nor(DEV):biz Big Dinner with Roarr! Dinosaur Adventure

When: 7th October, 2019

Where: Norwich City Football Club

How much: £40.99

Book: https://nordevbiz-oct-2019.eventbrite.co.uk

Join the best Norfolk and Norwich tech companies for dinner, while enjoying good food and great company.

Roarr! Dinosaur Adventure

A desire to innovate, with continual reinvestment creating bigger and bolder attractions – this is what our guest speakers have in mammoth (or should I say dinosaur!) proportions.

Owners of award-winning, Roarr! Dinosaur Adventure in Lenwade, Martin and Adam Goymour will be sharing their aspirations to develop this thriving business both in Norfolk and further afield. Not ones to rest on their laurels, they’ve already rebranded and invested millions so they can appeal to a broader market.

In 2018, they won the Best Large Visitor Attraction award in the Norfolk and Suffolk Tourism Awards. With more projects ‘in the pipeline’, their hard work and enthusiasm for innovation and redevelopment are evident.

From advancing their green energy strategy by placing solar panels on their indoor play area to a fossil dig and a steampunk-inspired restaurant in the Victorian walled garden, they are delighting thousands of visitors of all ages in Norfolk’s very own Jurassic Park.

About nor(DEV):biz

The aims of nor(DEV):biz (Norfolk Developers Business) are:

  • to be the go-to group for local businesses requiring a technology solution.
  • to facilitate and increase referrals and collaboration among Norfolk’s tech businesses.
  • to help close the digital skills gap.
  • to facilitate better collaboration between technology businesses and academic institutions.
  • to have a great meal with great company

Tickets prices do include a donation to the nor(DEV): chosen charity of the year, for 2019/2020.

Breakfast: One for the bikers with Matt Leach of Geotekk

Paul Grenyer from Paul Grenyer


Breakfast: One for the bikers with Matt Leach of Geotekk

When: Tuesday: September 3, 2019 - 7:30am to 8:30pm
Where: The Maids Head Hotel, Tombland, Norwich, NR3 1LB
How much: £13.95
RSVP: https://www.meetup.com/Norfolk-Developers-NorDev/events/qqwhznyzmbfb/

Matt will talk about Geotekk’s product design and fund raising journey and how the company has developed through a belief that anything which serves to reduce stress and worry in everyday lives enables a happier life empowering us to “Live More”.

Matt is co-founder of Geotekk, a company specialising in smart alarms for bikes. Founded in 2015 in response to ever-rising levels of bike theft, Matt and his co-founder James strive to provide customers with freedom and peace of mind by creating an affordable, versatile and best-in-class smart alarm. This alarm would combine and improve the most effective features of other security products into one multi-functional package.

Breakfast: Technological Future – Utopia or Dystopia?

Paul Grenyer from Paul Grenyer



When: 04/06/2019 07:30 - 08:30
Where: The Maids Head Hotel, Tombland, Norwich, Norwich
Price: 13.95 GBP
RSVP: https://www.meetup.com/Norfolk-Developers-NorDev/events/qqwhznyzjbgb/


Technological Future – Utopia or Dystopia?

A Norfolk Developers breakfast discussion with Callum Coombes and Fiona Lettice.

Technological innovation allows organisations to do more with less. As well as improving innovation and productivity, new technologies will help us with some of the key challenges ahead – making better use of limited resources like energy and water, mitigating the effects of climate change on food and poverty, disease prevention, and improving healthcare for an ageing population.

Technological innovation has generally been a powerful force for good, creating new jobs and improving salaries. But new technology also threatens jobs and whole industries, with devastating consequences in some communities and with the benefits unevenly distributed. So is the future utopian or dystopian?

Whichever, technological change will continue, so If we are to realise the potential of new technologies, like artificial intelligence and machine learning, we will need responsible innovation approaches and new regulatory frameworks.

We will need to develop future technologies using multidisciplinary perspectives and methods so that we better consider the future of work, protect our privacy and data, build consumer trust, and respond effectively to ethical and safety issues.

Norfolk Developers are facilitating this by bringing together its members and speakers to debate and shape a healthier technological future.