Event: nor(DEV), TechEast & Barclays Eagle Lab present the digital technology showcase

Paul Grenyer from Paul Grenyer



Event: nor(DEV), TechEast & Barclays Eagle Lab present the digital technology showcase

When: Monday, 29th October @ 6.30pm

Where: The King's Centre, King Street, Norwich, NR1 1PH

RSVP: https://www.meetup.com/Norfolk-Developers-NorDev/events/252875683/

Ever thought that technology could help your business but weren’t sure how?

Have you wanted to talk to experts about the advantages of business software but were afraid of being given a hard sell?

Do you have questions about software and technology but were unsure who to ask?

Our Technology Showcase is here to help! Norfolk Developers, along with TechEast and the Barclays Eagle Lab Norwich have put together an evening of talks and introductions to help companies access technology firms on an informal basis. No sales pitches, no pushy sales people, just information and introductions.

The evening will be free from complicated jargon and tech-speak and questions are actively encouraged! This is an evening designed for people who run businesses, not IT experts.

The Technology Showcase is your chance to understand the advantages that technology can offer your business, and an opportunity to pick the brains of the regions best software companies, without obligation.

The evening will begin with introductions to Norwich’s supportive tech community, who offer support, workshops and discussions to novices and experts alike.


  • SynchNorwich help promote startups and enable local tech businesses to grow.
  • DevelopHER promote equality in technology and host the successful DevelopHER awards, recognising women in technology.
  • Norfolk Developers are a group focussing on practical skills and hardcore software developing and run the annual nor(DEV): conference.
  • Hot Source are a creative community group that aims to promote digital enterprise in our region.


The second half of the evening will give tech companies a chance to explain what they do, how it can benefit you and answer any questions you might have.


  • Candour are a creative digital agency that harnesses the power of open minds and honest feedback to create engaging experiences for users and powerful platforms for business growth.
  • Neon Tribe develop software in three stages, using ‘Discovery, Development and Delivery’ process to ensure they get the results businesses want first time.
  • Selesti are a digital marketing agency who pride themselves on strategies that help brands achieve extraordinary things. There will be one final featured company.
  • TBC.


We hope you will join us in what promises to be an informative and informal evening, designed to help technology help your business.

Calling Companies – Showcase your Tech at Sync the City 54 Hour Startup event

Paul Grenyer from Paul Grenyer


Sync the City is a great event in which you can promote, share and test your API's, Tools and Services.  You could provide the vital ingredient that helps the startup teams Build & Launch a Startup in 54 Hours, and win the amazing cash prizes on offer!

Sync the City 2018 is a 54 Hour event that brings together local entrepreneurs, developers, business managers, marketing gurus, graphic artists, students to pitch ideas for new startup companies, form teams around those ideas, and work to develop a working prototype, demo & final pitch (to win cash prizes).

More details syncthecity.com

In the past, we have had companies providing free access to address lookup API's, customer surveying services, hosting services, sentiment analysis API's and much more.  Its a great opportunity to publicise your own SDK / APIs / Products to be used at the event, and put them to the test and get direct feedback.

If you are interested in getting involved, then email syncthecity@norfolkdevelopers.com.


Facebook’s Big Code Summit

Derek Jones from The Shape of Code

I was at Facebook’s first Big Code Summit on Monday and Tuesday (I say the first, because I hope there is another one next year).

The talks all involved machine learning (to be expected, given the Big Code in the event’s title). Normally I ignore papers on machine learning in software engineering, but understanding code is hard and we don’t know much about it. As I keep telling anyone who will listen, machine learning is the tool to use when you don’t know what you are doing (provided you have enough data).

People have been learning code patterns for some time now, suggesting applications in code completion in the IDE and finding suspicious API sequences (e.g., a missing call). This is one area where machine learning is a natural solution: nobody has the time to write down all the common patterns, for all the common languages, and APIs are constantly changing. It makes no sense to solve this problem manually.

So what was new and/or interesting?

We got new and very interesting in the first talk, when Eran Yahav presented his group’s work on cod2vec, the paper was interesting, but the demo had the wow factor.

I have not made up my mind about Michael Pradel‘s proposal for learning new coding rule checks. These rules are often created by people, but people with the necessary skill are thin on the ground. Machine learning requires something to learn from, how could coding rules be created this way. Michael’s group is working on a system where developers create the positive and negative cases and a machine learner figures out rules from these examples. Would the creation of these positive/negative examples prove to be just as hard as writing rules? I was not convinced that such an approach was practical, but if somebody wants to try it out, why not.

I found Xinyun Chen‘s talk interesting, but then I’ve written lots of parsers, and automatically figuring out how to parse a language from examples will always get my attention. A few people in the audience thought that a better solution was typing in a grammar and parsing the ‘usual’ way. This approach assumes a grammar exists, can be strong-armed into a form that is practical to embed in a parser (requiring somebody skilled in the necessary black arts), to produce a system that will only process complete translation units (or whatever the language calls a unit of translation).

Graft Animation Language on Raspberry Pi

Andy Balaam from Andy Balaam's Blog

Because the Rapsberry Pi uses a slightly older Python version, there is a special version of Graft for it.

Here’s how to get it:

  • Open a terminal window by clicking the black icon with a “>” symbol on it at the top near the left.
  • First we need to install a couple of things Graft needs, so type this, then press Enter:
    sudo apt install python3-attr at-spi2-core
  • If you want to be able to make animated GIFs, install one more thing:
    sudo apt install imagemagick
  • To download Graft and switch to the Raspberry Pi version, type in these commands, pressing Enter after each line.
    git clone https://github.com/andybalaam/graft.git
    cd graft
    git checkout raspberry-pi
  • Now, you should be able to run Graft just like on another computer, for example, like this:
    ./graft 'd+=10 S()'
  • If you’re looking for a fun way to start, why not try the worksheet “Tell a story by making animations with code”?

    For more info, see Graft Raspberry Pi Setup.

Continuous Digital published – done?

Allan Kelly from Allan Kelly Associates

CDpile2cut-2018-10-9-14-43.jpg

Continuous Digital is done.

Probably. Maybe. Definitely maybe.

Continuous Digital is the second of my two #NoProjects books. Many people ask: “why two?” “What is the difference between them?” “Do I need to read both?”

Short answer: Project Myopia explains why the project model is bad for software development. Continuous Digital describes what to do instead.

Long answer: as the #NoProjects hypothesis grew, as I thought about it more, as I talked to others about the ideas – specifically Steve Smith, Joshua Arnold and Evan Leybourn – the ideas grew. My thinking both on “what to do instead of project management” and “why do something different” grew.

Specifically I saw that the combination of Continual Delivery and Digital Business meant there was a stand alone case for moving beyond the project model. Whether you agree with the problems I discuss in Project Myopia or not there is a case for changing the way businesses are managed.

That is why I split the too books. Project Myopia is a companion book, it is not a prequel, a sequel, a book one or a book two. It is a book some people will read in its own right.

Continuous Digital argues that since business are increasingly digital, and as businesses strive to survive and grow then technology development is not a separate “project” it is inherent to the business. Technology and innovation are business as usual.

Stopping, even pausing, work – as in the project model – surrenders competitive advantage and introduces extra costs (time, money, risk). What is needed is a new model. A continuous model.

Continuous Digital is now published on Amazon in digital form and will soon be there – and in other booksellers – in physical form. (If you can’t wait for a print copy you can buy one from Lulu where they are slightly cheaper too.)

So I’d like to say Continuous Digital is done. But…

Even before I saw the final print version I had requests for an audio version of both Project Myopia and Continuous Digital. I’m debating whether to do these, if you would buy an audio version please let me know, if enough people want it I’ll do it.

Second, once I saw and held the final, done, version in print new ideas came to me. I don’t want to revisit the text – although I might fix a couple of typos – but Continuous Digital is a big book, 350 pages. And I know many people will be put off by the size.

So I’m thinking of turning it into four smaller books, each around 100 pages in length and each corresponding to one part of Continuous Digital. Maybe.

It is never done. It is continual.

The post Continuous Digital published – done? appeared first on Allan Kelly Associates.

Win an Echo Dot with Naked Element at the Norfolk Chamber B2B

Paul Grenyer from Paul Grenyer



On Thursday 11th October Naked Element will be making its yearly pilgrimage to the Norfolk Chamber of Commerce and Industry’s annual B2B event at Norwich City Football Club. We’re looking forward to seeing clients old and new, meeting new people and most of all YOU!

This year we have stand number 85 on Top of the Terrace (Level 2). All of the Naked Element team will be on the stand at various points throughout the day and we’ll looking forward to Rain Crowson helping us out at lunchtime and during the afternoon.

We’ll be raffling an Echo Dot in exchange for your business card and offering new potential clients £500 off their projects over £10,000.

Come and see us, we’re looking forward to seeing you!

Talk – Getting started with geospatial data in MongoDB (MDBW 2017)

Timo Geusch from The Lone C++ Coder's Blog

I’ve been meaning to post this link for quite a while now but keep forgetting to do so. If you are planning to store geospatial data in MongoDB, the database offers you a variety of ways to deal with geospatial-specific data storage and queries. I gave an introductory talk on this subject at MongoDB World […]

The post Talk – Getting started with geospatial data in MongoDB (MDBW 2017) appeared first on The Lone C++ Coder's Blog.

New Directions Of Interpolation – a.k.

a.k. from thus spake a.k.

We have spent a few months looking at how we might interpolate between sets of points (xi, yi), where the xi are known as nodes and the yi as values, to approximate values of y for values of x between the nodes, either by connecting them with straight lines or with cubic curves.
Last time, in preparation for interpolating between multidimensional vector nodes, we implemented the ak.grid type to store ticks on a set of axes and map their intersections to ak.vector objects to represent such nodes arranged at the corners of hyperdimensional rectangular cuboids.
With this in place we're ready to take a look at one of the simplest multidimensional interpolation schemes; multilinear interpolation.

Disaster Recovery: A Dynamic Redundancy Approach

Tim Pizey from Tim Pizey

The problem with disaster planning is that it is not rehearsed. When you need to retrieve a file from backup is when you discover that your backup has been broken for three months.

Modern cloud systems, based upon software defined infrastructure and redundant, auto-scaling fleets of micro-services, come with disaster recovery built in. They are designed to be resilient against DDoS attacks, unexpected peaks in usage and continent wide unavailability.

Some systems have yet to migrate to outsourced infrastructure, some never will migrate. For these systems we need a Disaster Recovery Strategy which can be implemented within reasonable costs and ideally does not suffer from the fails when needed feature of many backup systems. One answer is to do regular fire drills. No one would dispute the importance of fire drills in saving lives and ensuring that people know what to do in the case of a real fire, however we all know there is a big difference between a rehearsal and the real thing.

The key insight in the modern cloud architectures is that every version of a system is the same (at a particular time).

We can reduce this to a minimal redundant system: a pair of identical systems with one designated Primary and the other Secondary, with a standard data mirroring link from Primary to Secondary.

To ensure that both elements of the pair really can function as the Primary you could rehearse a cutover one weekend.

But if the two systems really are identical then there is no reason to reverse the cutover at the end of the rehearsal. The old Secondary is the new Primary, the old Primary is the new Secondary. The Primary can be swapped at a periodicity the business is comfortable with, say twice a year.

This Dynamic Redundancy strategy ensures that your Disaster Recovery works when you need it to and can be adjusted according to the business' appetite for risk.